edible insects

KINSHASA (Reuters) – There is no shortage of protein in Kinshasa’s Gambela Market, from cows to antelope and snakes. But it is the blue and silver bowls brimming with twitching crickets, termites and slithering mealworms that do the briskest trade.

Experts hope that the love of edible insects in Democratic Republic of Congo may hold the key to tackling widespread hunger among its roughly 65 million people by scaling up a millennia-old consumption habit.

Six-and-a-half million people live in food insecurity in the giant central African country, according to the World Food Program (WFP), largely due to low agricultural productivity and persistent violence in its volatile east.

Edible insects, which are just starting to win acceptance in the West, have long been one of Congo’s most popular dishes. Often served as bar food or on special occasions, they are grilled and commonly served with hot pepper, lemon and onions.

 

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